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Interview: Stephen Edward Samuelian on Charitable Giving

In Health and Beauty on July 31, 2015 at 7:12 pm

A board member of Rising Star Outreach, Stephen Edward Samuelian understands the concept of giving beyond the surface. Here, Mr. Samuelian answers some questions about giving and why he believes that philanthropy should be viewed as an investment.

Presentation Solutions: We are so glad you could sit with us today.

Stephen Edward Samuelian: I have been looking forward to it!

Presentation Solutions: We’d like to open our time together by asking about the different types of charities out there. To what types of organizations can people give?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: There are charities for virtually any cause you can think of. Religion, education, and social services are among the most prevalent.

Presentation Solutions: And in what ways do these charities receive donor funds?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Of course, there are direct cash gifts. Charities can also benefit from volunteered time or items for use or to resale in order to raise money.

Presentation Solutions: What are donor-advised funds?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: A donor-advised fund is one in which funds contributed to the donor’s cause is managed by a legal non-profit organization. These funds allow the donor to retain some advisory privileges, making them attractive for high-value benefactors.

Presentation Solutions: So then there is some control retained over how the money is spent?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Yes, and this makes these types of funds a great way to invest in a charity of choice.

Presentation Solutions: What do you mean by “invest?”

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Well, personally I think that all donations should be viewed as an investment.

Presentation Solutions: As opposed to a gift?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Exactly. I say this because, with an investment, there is some expectation of a return on the funds. Charitable giving should be no different.

Presentation Solutions: You mean that a donor should make a profit off his or her donations?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: No, not an investment in that sense. When you give, you should seek a giving vehicle that will do the most with your money; In other words, one that maximizes the gift and has the most positive effect.

Presentation Solutions: That makes a lot of sense actually. So you are saying it’s best to do some research and not just give without knowing how the nonprofit operates?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Bingo! Giving is a wonderful thing, but if you give to a cause and your money doesn’t actually do any good, what’s the point?

Presentation Solutions: So, are there any guidelines we should use or questions that we can run by ourselves before we “shop around” for a charity?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: I’d say to make sure the foundation to which you plan to give is really aligned with your idea of the cause and that they have an actual plan in place for how to use donated funds.

Presentation Solutions: What are your thoughts on public giving versus doing it “out of the limelight?”

Stephen Edward Samuelian: There are arguments that support both sides of this. On one hand, you may not want the public praise; some are ridiculed as using a charity as a tax write-off, which is rarely – if ever – the case.

Presentation Solutions: And on the other…?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: High-profile philanthropists often inspire others to get involved and to make a difference; it creates a ripple effect of giving.

Presentation Solutions: And so, if they went about as “unsung heroes,” the ripple effect might not travel as far?

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Correct…but in the end, it all comes down to personal preference.

Presentation Solutions: That’s great insight and we appreciate your taking the time to chat today. We’d love to sit down with you again sometime.

Stephen Edward Samuelian: Anytime. Thank you for having me.

Dennis Wong | YOR Health Celebrates “Lucky #7”

In Health and Beauty on July 28, 2015 at 6:53 am

Dennis Wong YOR HealthAlong with sister Sophia, Dennis Wong, YOR Health co-founder, celebrates the company’s 7th birthday.

Sophia and Dennis Wong, YOR Health founders, started their company in 2008. The pair have made it their priority to bring the most advanced, high-quality nutrition to people across the globe. According to Dennis Wong, YOR Health is proud to be a part of so many people’s lives. He recently sat down with Presentation Solutions to chat about the company’s “Lucky #7.”

Q: How did you go from real estate to real health products?

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: Around my 40th birthday, I was diagnosed with a number of health conditions including prediabetes. I could not keep up with the demands of my day-to-day life. My sister and I decided to jump into action and researched until we found a company that believed the same things that we did.

Q: And what was that…?

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: That what you put into your body directly affects what you get out of it!

Q: When was the company actually founded?

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: It was on Tuesday, May 5, 2008 – Cinco de Mayo. I remember being so excited and ready to share our passion for nutrition with the world.

Q: And now YOR Health is a movement…

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: It’s been called that. We’re proud to have heralded a new era in nutrition and healthy living to people across the globe. We believe that with good health comes a celebration of life every single day.

Q: How has YOR Health impacted people financially over the last seven years?

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: YOR Health doesn’t just provide products. We are an entire network of like-minded individuals with the singular goal to spread health and prosperity all over the world.

Q: How has YOR Health personally changed your life for the better?

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: Most importantly by helping me focus on what’s important, my overall health. I no longer look at the scales for comfort and guidance. I now know that my digestive health really and truly dictates how I feel from the moment I wake until my head hits the pillow.

Q: What makes this year “Lucky #7?”

Dennis Wong, YOR Health: We are still growing and going strong. Over the last year, we’ve introduced a number of new products and programs that have been a godsend for our current customers and Independent Representatives. This year will be even bigger and better and we believe we can bring health and prosperity to anyone willing to put their best foot forward.

Simple Acts of Kindness Beneficial To Health

In Health and Beauty on February 2, 2015 at 5:31 pm

KindnessMost people know that kindness is a good thing. Now, researchers believe even simple acts of kindness done often can improve both the mental and physical health of the doer. Here’s why:

  1. Kindness makes you feel good.

From a biochemical level, being kind helps the body produce dopamine. This chemical, which produces the same effect on the body as morphine but in a healthy way, is released when we feel good about ourselves such as the case after doing something nice.

  1. Kindness is good for the heart.

Symbolically as well as physiologically, kindness can make the heart grow stronger. This is due to the body’s correlation of emotional warmth and the secretion of the hormone oxytocin. Oxytocin releases nitrous oxide in the blood vessels. This dilates the vessels reducing the blood pressure and offering key cardiovascular benefits.

  1. Kindness keeps us young.

The natural process of aging is amplified by inflammation and free radicals. The release of oxytocin helps to reduce the levels of these perpetuators of age, keeping us young from the the inside out.

  1. Kindness makes stronger relationships.

In the days of the caveman, humans had to learn to interact and cooperate with one another to ensure their survival and that of the human race.  Today, we live with what is known as the “kindness gene” that encourages us to do things for one another to forge and strengthen relationships. Strong relationships are vital to an individual’s mental health.

  1. Kindness is (fortunately) contagious.

Acts of kindness tend to encourage other people – whether consciously or not – to be nice to others. Effectively, one random act of kindness could trigger an unlimited flow of positive feelings. Theoretically, if there were enough kindness in the world the human race would be, as a whole, a healthier, happier and longer-living species.

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