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Help Your Child Avoid Mid-Semester Slump

In Education on October 9, 2020 at 2:23 pm

Currey IngramFrom the euphoric, first-day “high,” students eventually feel their energy and enthusiasm waning mid-semester. It takes longer to complete tasks, time management begins to falter, and grades start to dip.

Brentwood private school Currey Ingram Academy shares tips on how you can help your child beat the mid-semester slump.

Improve time management skills

Help your child become more realistic with how he or she uses time by asking him or her to estimate how much time is needed to complete a certain task and compare this to the actual amount of time it takes. Let’s say your child thinks the estimated time (ET) to finish reading a chapter of a book is 15 minutes; he or she should then keep track of the actual time (AT) it takes. Students with poor time management skills often have disparate ETs and ATs. The closer these times become, the more they are able to realistically manage their time.

Teach them to prioritize

Students might feel overwhelmed with all the things they have to do: homework, projects, school play rehearsals, after-school sports practice, playdates, and more. Teach your child to identify which of these are more important to them than the others; what’s considered important should be prioritized. If your child has an upcoming exam, a paper to write, and a scheduled dinner with classmates, ask him or her to make a priority list. In doing this, he or she may realize that there’s not enough time — or energy — to do everything and decide to cancel what’s least important. 

Break tasks into bite-sized pieces

Big projects can be daunting and your students might be at a loss on how to even begin. To overcome that feeling of helplessness, teach your child to break tasks into smaller pieces. If a major presentation is due in three weeks, map out which tasks should be completed on a daily and weekly basis. Put this plan in a calendar and commit to it. Not only will the presentation be more manageable; ticking off to-do’s every day will also give your child a sense of accomplishment and a well-deserved confidence boost.

Beat the blues with rewards

When schoolwork seems endless and there are long nights of studying at hand, it’s best to give your child something to look forward to. Ask your child what rewards excite him or her; it could be a video game session, a movie break, a favorite snack, or a favorite meal. The reward could be given after completing all reading assignments, for example. This helps break the monotony of studying and can better prepare the child for a more successful adulthood.

Meditation helps

Meditation can help your child relax. Ask your child to lie on his or her back or sit still for five minutes. Have him or her place their hands on their belly to feel their stomach rise and lower as you instruct them to inhale through the nose for four counts, hold their breath for four counts, then slow exhale for another four counts. Repeat this process for five minutes or longer, as long as the entire exercise is relaxing and not causing extra tension. Ask your child to ignore any external thoughts they may have and to just focus on the breathing.

It’s not unusual for some students to feel anxious and stressed mid-semester, especially during unprecedented situations like what we are currently facing. Be there to help your child build the mental fortitude to believe that this season will pass and he or she will successfully overcome it. 

A private school in Brentwood, Currey Ingram Academy supports and empowers students with learning differences to achieve their fullest potential – academically and socially – within an environment that fosters holistic student development. Get in touch by calling (615) 507-3173.

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