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Aviation Tips from John Stein | Current Options for Cabin Creature Comfort

In Professionals on May 22, 2012 at 7:29 pm

During his lengthy career in the aviation business, John Stein personally thinks that cabin comfort in private jets has reached new heights. According to John Stein, the comfort factor isn’t just for show. Whether you’re flying from his office in San Francisco or your own in New York or Miami, the more comfortable you are the less you will be tired or jet lagged – and when time is money, being rested can be worth millions.

John Stein has seen the obvious niceties including roomier seats with butter-soft leather as well as headroom so that even the tallest passengers can stand up and move about comfortably. Other fatigue-reducing improvements include air quality in the cabin, natural light, vibration and ambient noise. When you’ve got clients planning to fly extra long-range, adds John Stein, the comfort factor ramps up in importance.

Take air pressure as an example. According to John Stein, a commercial flight can reduce a passenger’s intake of oxygen by approximately 4 percent when flying at 8,000 feet. This causes fatigue — the longer the trip, the more tired the passenger. When you improve the differential in pressurization, passengers (and crew) find that the fatigue factor is greatly reduced. This goes directly to safety aspects as well, points out John Stein. A tired crew can make mistakes, which is why cabin pressure that can simulate close to sea level altitude is a feature that many of the more recent private aircraft strive for (and some actually deliver).

Commercial airliners filter a mix of fresh and re-circulated air, which is very dry. Not only does the dehydration cause passenger discomfort, it also encourages airborne illnesses. Some private aircraft for sale by John Stein offer features like humidifiers, bacteria filters and fresh air throughout the flight, and these all add up to a more comfortable and pleasant flight experience.

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